. Scott Semans World Coins: Malay Region

SCOTT SEMANS WORLD COINS
MALAY & INDONESIAN COINAGES

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     This is a listing in progress of my stock of Malay regional coins. For ordering information please see the link above. References used are K = Krause-Mishler Standard Catalog of World Coins and SS = Singh, Saran, The Coins of Malaysia Singapore and Brunei 1400-1967, (1996 ed.).

CLICK ON CATALOG REFERENCE TO SEE SCAN


MALACCA SULTANATE

     Following a period of domination by the northerly kingdom of Funan and later the maritime empires of Majopahit and Srivijaya, the Sultanate of Malacca was formed about 1400 AD in the southwestern portion of the peninsula, soon spreading its influence throughout the region, until conquered by the Portuguese operating out of India in 1511.
     These are tin coins, crudely made, dark in color, and rough from soil or water immersion, however they do look better "in person" than in the scans, as it is impossible to get good scans of very dark coins. Generally the design is quite bold and the coins are not seriously worn, but they are not "pretty." Scans are enlarged to show detail, and show typical examples, not necessarily the specimen you will receive.

SS1   Sult, Muzaffar Shah, 1446-56/9?, Tin Pitis, O: "Muzaffar Shah Al Sultan", R: "Nasir al Dunia Wa'l Din" 19-21m, 1.6-2.3g First coin of Sultanate   MN1, SS-1, Prid-1   very crude, look Vg-F 12.50

SS2q   Sult, Muzaffar Shah, 1446-56/9?, Tin 1/4 Pitis, Legends presumably as the Pitis and 1/2 Pitis. 9-11m, .38, .47g These specimens come from a supplier knowledgeable in the coinage, and I am seeking better examples.   Unlisted.   INQUIRE

PORTUGUESE MALACCA

Click HERE for a listing of Portuguese Malacca offerings.

PAHANG AND PERAK TIN MONEY FORMS

     Between the 1820s and 1980s Malaysia was one of the world's leading tin producers, and nearly all of the pre-Colonial coinage of the region, both conventional and "ethnographic" forms, was in tin. Three states, Pahang with its tin "hats," and Perak and Selangor with animal shapes and small ingots of varying shapes, are responsible for the non-coin tin monies. The "hats," or Tampang are the most coin-like, bearing dates and being cast to specific weight standards. The animal forms were likely commemorative or amuletic in nature, while the ingots, or Bidor, were a widely accepted market currency. As Saran Singh notes in The Coins of Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei (1996, p.183) "The value of each ingot depended upon its weight, thus the shape and size of each ingot was of little consequence. Most of the tin ingots were cast in Perak but a small quantity were also cast in the neighbouring State of Selangor. These tin ingots circulated extensively in Perak, Selangor, and Negeri Sembilan over a very long period. They were also acceptable in the neighbouring Malay States n the Malay Peninsula as well as in Sumatra." Note: There is a forgery operation in Kuala Lumpur producing coins and animal forms. Most products have a whitish cast; some examples HERE and even moreHERE.

880     Cone Ingot, Bidor   Perak State, ca.16th Cent. - 1850s, size 15-20m tall, weight range 5.19 - 17.08 gms for small sample, likely representing a fraction of a cent at the time. See Singh #7-10. These small ingots have come on the market in the last few years from dredging and construction preparations, as well as the usual metal-detecting and sifting.     Typical piece as shown in scan: $22.50

881     Rod or "hairpin" Ingot, Bidor   Perak State, ca.16th Cent. - 1850s, size 40-65m long, weight range 5.75 - 17.28 gms for small sample, likely representing a fraction of a cent at the time.      Typical piece as shown in scan: $22.50

880s     SET of cone shaped and Rod (hairpin) shaped pieces (2): $40.00

882     Odd shaped Ingots, Bidor   Perak State, ca.16th Cent. - 1850s, Less usual shapes, as shown in scan: a-c) 25.00 each;   d) 30.00;   e-f) 22.50 each

TEGAL

     In the May-June 1990 issue (#124) of the ONS Journal , Dr. T.D. Yih described and illustrated some small tin/lead square-hole pieces which he tentatively attributes to Tegal based on an 1886 journal article. Tegal is a city and region on the north central coast of Java which was alternately independent or subject to the sway of regional Empires. Under the Dutch it was the main port of export for sugar. The basic coin is a crude imitation of the Chinese T'ang coin Kai Yuan tong bao. Based on similar coinages of the region, these likely date to the 15th - 18th century. Dr. Yih had purchased five pieces and had not heard of others until the group of 20 which I purchased 2007-08

TEGAL   Lead/tin Kai-yuan tong-bao, 17-20m, with large center hole, weights range 0.65 - 2.38gm   Poor quality, your choice of specimen by gm weight $20 Each;    Corroded pieces (bottom row) $10 Each

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